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Posts tagged ‘Beat Poets’

Contents – The Beat and the Hungry generation: When losing became hip (Issue 26)

Contents - The Beat and the Hungry generation: When losing became hip (Issue 26)

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Guest-Editorial – The Beat and the Hungry generation: When losing became hip

By Abhimanyu Kumar & Goirick Brahmachari
It was indeed an enriching experience to go through the pieces, to learn about the new areas that have remained unexplored, to acquaint ourselves with some critical questions that require attention within the scope of the Beat and the Hungryalist literature, and to trace the mutual connections and differences between the two schools, their triumphs and follies.

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Project Ginsberg & Me: Ruminations on Freedom

By Anuj Gupta, Yatin Dawra, and Dhairya Gupta
They present an audio-visual montage that juxtaposes social commentary with electronica, while paying homage to the work of Beats, especially Ginsberg’s poetry.

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Spring and Oblivion: Howl Revisited

By Indran Amirthanayagam
Allen Ginsberg read ‘Howl’ on that Honolulu visit in 1977 before a crowd at the East West Center. He shared the stage with Ediriweera Sarachchandra, a great playwright in Sinhala, also a guest of my father’s. Sarachchandra played the veena, Ginsberg the harmonium, and together they welcomed the audience to their seats with an improvised – first thought, best thought – raga.

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The Ginsberg-Dylan Express: Tangled Up in Vomit and Blues

By Brinda Bose
Was Allen Ginsberg a singer-songwriter? Is Bob Dylan a poet? Could each have been both when they met and made poems and songs together – capricious, frenzied – across two decades in the 1960s and ’70s?

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Talking Poetry, Ginsberg and the Hungryalists: Samir Roychoudhury, a retrospective

By Maitreyee B Chowdhury
It is difficult to look at the soft-spoken Samir today and conceptualize the firebrand young man he must have been, a man whose poetry has over the years fired the imagination of many. So how did his family react to his poetry, I ask in jest. All around the world poets are considered crazy, it’s no different here, he concludes laughingly.

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In the Shadow of Famine

By Priyabrata Das
My school days, a part of it, was spent in this neighborhood. It was 1944. The shadow of famine, destitution, the Second World War, sandbagged baffle wall, overwhelming black-out nights, etc. were in a deep embrace with Calcutta’s (now Kolkata) life. In the midst of this came the world’s most devastating famine. Five million perished within less than two years.

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Reading Hungryalists as One Who Came After: A Feminist Critique

By Nandini Dhar
In other words, I am asking, what place has been accorded to women within the Hungryalist texts. I will begin with a generalization. Women appear in Hungryalist poems as bodies – sexual bodies – and nothing but bodies on which desire is projected.

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A Sojourn in Tangier

By Marc Goldin
Kerouac and Corso, extending the New York manic road-trip sensibility probably never stopped moving long enough to truly get a sense of the inner life of Tangier, one kick after another, pausing to sleep here and there. But one figures that the Tangier sea-air had to have permeated their young American psyches, even while they slept.

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