Skip to content

Submissions

Scroll down to see the guidelines for guest-editing an issue and our forthcoming issues/concept notes:

General Submission Guidelines:

1. We are ideologically neutral and invite submissions from the perspectives of all ideologies – right, center, left etc. – as long as a piece makes a reasoned argument.

2. While emailing your pieces, please write ‘Magazine Piece: Issue No.’ in the subject line. Send submissions and queries to email ids of individual guest editors listed with concept notes.

3. The pieces should be around 2000-2500 words. We are open to making exceptions to this rule, if a particular piece deserves more space.

4. We are open to audio-visual submissions (in the form of interviews, conversations etc.). The audio-visual files must not be more than 20 minutes in duration. Again, we are open to making exceptions to this rule in some cases.

5. We invite Photo Essays on the given topic of a particular issue. We will include a maximum of 15 photos in a Photo Essay.

6. In case the authors are making submissions to multiple magazines, blogs, and newspapers,  they must inform Cafe Dissensus the moment the piece is accepted elsewhere. Once Cafe Dissensus accepts a piece and starts working on it, it cannot be published in another magazine, blog, and newspaper.

7. The materials on Cafe Dissensus are protected under Creative Commons License. Once a piece is published in Cafe Dissensus, we will retain exclusive copyright for a period of 30 days, from the date of publication. Within this period, the piece cannot be re-published elsewhere even in an adapted and modified form.Thereafter, it must be acknowledged that the piece was first published in Cafe Dissensus. Failing to comply with this and any unauthorized republication/reproduction of the piece will invite legal measures and prosecution.

8. We are a completely voluntary endeavor and we are unable to pay our authors.

Guidelines for Guest-Editing an Issue:

We invite our readers, teachers, scholars, students, journalists/media professionals, activists, professionals (practically, anyone who would like to!) to guest-edit an issue of Cafe Dissensus. Here are the guidelines for guest-editing an issue: 

1. The Guest-Editor must send in a 150 word concept note/call for papers to the editors (Email: infocafedissensus@gmail.com) well in advance, describing the theme of the issue (along with raising some questions). We will put up the CFP/concept note on the magazine website and on the magazine social-media pages.

2.There must be at least 15-18 articles plus the guest-editorial.

3. Each article must be between 2000-2500 words. However, the guest-editor might include a few longer essays, if she/he feels necessary.

4. Since the magazine is geared toward non-academic readers, all footnotes and references must be taken out. The citations within the body of the articles must be minimal, in the form of the name of an author or an idea etc. Please keep this readability factor in mind while soliciting articles and editing them.

5. We expect at least some of the pieces to be personal narratives, wherever possible. One of our aims is to weave the personal with the public/political.

6. Audio-visual content is one of our distinctive features. The guest-editors must include at least 3-4 audio-visual interviews, conversations etc. in the edited issue. For example, interviews and conversations recorded as audio-video or audio. We can help with the logistics of recording and editing the content.

7. The guest-editor will be in charge of collecting, selecting, and editing the articles. All articles will go through a final-edit by the Editors of the magazine.

8. The guest-editor must write an 800-1000 word editorial.

____________________________________________

2020 Cafe Dissensus Issues

Issue 54: January 2020: Poetics and politics of the ‘everyday’: Engaging with India’s northeast [Last date for submission: 30 November, 2019; Date of publication: 1 January, 2020]

Guest-Editors: Bhumika R, English Instructor, IIT Jammu & Dr. Suranjana Choudhury, Assistant Professor, Department of English, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong.

Concept Note: Northeast India has been consistently imagined in the popular discourse in India/ in the rest of the country as a space and a culture that is either exotic or as mired in conflict. The positioning of a space, communities, cultures and societies within such narrow definitions/ categories can deny an understanding/ prevents and does not allow an understanding of the complex textures of the society, cultures and people inhabiting this broad terrain termed as the Northeast. Everyday imaginations of individual and collective lives can offer narratives of identity that move beyond the apriori binary, specifically in the case of the Northeast. Most of the communities who have made this region their home possess a formidable story-telling tradition. Here the oral blends with the written to yield a kind of literature, which in the views of many, is a confident assertion of voice and identity. It has the effect of dismantling existing stereotypes and binaries. Mundane elements constituting the everyday works as an important site of resistance against constructed identities and offer the textured nature of identity weave, constituting this space. Extending Henri Lefebvre’s (1971) discussions of the everyday, the emphasis on the everyday in this case, concerns ‘an analysis of everyday life that will expose its ambiguities – its baseness and exuberance, its poverty and fruitfulness- and (…) creative energies that are an integral part of it’.

In the context of the Northeast, studies pertaining to everyday have discussed the imaginings of everyday in the genre of visual (specifically photography). Amit R Baishya’s (2019) discussion of everyday in the context of Assamese literature points to the ruptures caused by larger socio-political events on the mundane life of individuals.[3] The questions and concerns which the current issue seeks to explore are: How are the imaginings of everyday or the ordinary articulated in the realm of culture, including literature? What do these articulations of everyday and engaging with the ordinary tell us of the collective history and politics of the space and its inhabitants? Can shifts be traced in the understanding of everyday in the last few decades (roughly since the 1950s up to the present)? What do these shifts indicate with regard to the understandings of everyday? Can practices function as important registers of resistance against apriori constructs of identity? How do contemporary literary articulations from Northeast engage with questions of the everyday?

In ​​the​​ proposed ​​issue​​ of​​ Cafe ​​Dissensus, ​​we​​ invite ​ papers, photo-​essays, audio-visual narrations​ or​ interviews, memoirs, non-fiction, etc. that explore ​​​varied contours of the idea of the ‘everyday’ and its literary and cultural representations in India’s northeast in the recent times. We are also keen at engaging with such discourses in ​​​various media like movies,​music,​​ dance, ​​theatre ​​or ​​any ​​other ​art​​​ forms.

Submission should be approximately 2000-2500 words. We also invite audio-visual submissions (in the form of interviews, conversations, etc.) The audio-visual files must not be more than 20 minutes in duration. Photo Essays are also invited with not more than 15 photos in an essay. Please do provide a brief bio at the end of your piece. Since the magazine is geared toward non-academic readers, the citations within the body of the articles must be minimal, in the form of the name of an author or an idea, etc. The issue is planned for online publication on 1 January, 2020. Submissions will be accepted till 30 November, 2019. Please email your submissions to northeasteveryday@gmail.com

Issue 55: March 2020: Climate Change in Literature [Last date for submission: 31 January, 2020; Date of publication: 1 March, 2020]

Guest Editors: Dr. Morve Roshan K., Research Associate, Bangor University, UK and Prof. Niyi Akingbe, South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa.

Concept Note: As the world witnesses persistent flooding, earthquake, landslide and a rise in the ocean surge, climate change now constitutes an emergent issue in global discourse. Ecological narratives are now being featured to illustrate the effects of climate change in most literary works of the world literatures. Eco-criticism looks at the impact of climate change as it affects the environment in terms of food production, desert encroachment and the drying up of the lakes and rivers in the world, and especially in the third world countries which have been described as the most vulnerable parts of the world with possible consequences of a submerge and extinction in another few years.

Contributors are expected to focus on the following areas in their papers:

  • Theories of Eco-criticism
  • Theories of political ecology
  • Analysis of Environmental crisis in Poetry
  • Discourse of climate change in Drama
  • How is the climate change represented in Fiction
  • Climate change in the Short Stories
  • Environmental crisis in the Bio/Auto-Biography
  • A representation of climate change in theatre productions
  • Climate change in Digital literature

We invite papers that relate, but not limited to, the above mentioned questions.

Submission should be approximately 2000-3500 words. We also invite audio-visual submissions (in the form of interviews, conversations, etc.) The audio-visual files must not be more than 20 minutes in duration. Photo Essays are also invited with not more than 15 photos in an essay. Please do provide a brief bio at the end of your piece. Since the magazine is geared toward non-academic readers, the citations (APA Style) within the body of the articles must be minimal, in the form of the name of an author or an idea, etc. The issue is planned for online publication on 1 March, 2020. Submissions will be accepted till 31 January, 2020. Please email your submissions to morve_roshan@rediffmail.com

14 Comments Post a comment
  1. Md Hasan, Ali #

    I want to published my article in your paper. Please send me the process of submission.

    September 25, 2014
  2. Fuad TP #

    One who born to write will search to reflect himself. Praise the lord. At last I found it
    Please inform me how I submit my piece of work.

    July 5, 2015
  3. I am a researcher and want to guest-edit an issue. How to approach and what should I do? If you kindly let me know, will be great help. I am quite confused with the notions of “concept note” and “writing to the editors in advance” kind of things.

    January 25, 2017
  4. Yaipha #

    If my Paper is published, which is in reviewed process for the July Issue 48. How and where to get the hard copy or the publication is only online?. Kindly advised.

    June 27, 2018
  5. sandhu pushp #

    I have been eagerly awaiting the issue on ‘The New Woman’.

    September 21, 2018
  6. SHYAONTI TALWAR #

    The procedure does not say anything about the submission of poems. Do poems also need to adhere to a particular theme?

    March 4, 2019
    • Depends on issues. Not all issues accept poems. You have to get in touch with individual editors, who is editing an issue. Alternately, you may submit poems to Cafe Dissensus Everyday (cafedissensusblog.com). Go to the webpage and check the submissions section.

      March 4, 2019

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Centre for the Study of Education and Work: Update 9th September 2013 | All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski
  2. Call for submissions: “Here and There: The Diaspora Universe” | Bhaswati Ghosh
  3. Call for submissions: The Everyday and Other Tagore | Bhaswati Ghosh

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: