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Posts from the ‘Issue 9/Inland Labor Migration in India’ Category

Contents – Inland Labor Migration in India (Issue 9)

Contents: Inland Labor Migration in India (Issue 9)

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Guest Editorial: Inland labour migration in India: Patterns of the phenomenon and critical possibilities

By Soma Chatterjee
Collectively, the contributions point towards a few broad themes. Indian cities, magnets for migrant workers, are, at the same time, apathetic, if not hostile towards them. Migrant workers are shorn of basic rights to education and health, only to increase their exploitability. It seems that it is their bottomless marginality that fuels India’s growth story. Further, it seems lack of recognition at both source and destination is an issue for migrant workers.

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The Invisible City Makers: Of migration and migrant workers in India

By Amrita Sharma & Rajiv Khandewal
The story of economic growth in India is essentially the story of labor migration and of migrants, who leave the increasingly poor villages with a decadent farm economy in search of better lives. They build resplendent city economies but fail to get a share of the riches; much worse, many struggle for a dignified human existence – for shelter, subsidized food, healthcare, and education – in the same cities they build.

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Book Review: Aman Sethi’s A Free Man: A True Story of Life and Death in Delhi

By Mosarrap H. Khan
While narrativizing the social biography of his respondent, Sethi does not subscribe to the standard triumph-of-the-underdog narrative. Rather, Sethi’s realist depiction is suffused with pessimism, resulting from an understanding that Ashraf’s waywardness will never allow him to live a life of bourgeois respectability.

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A tête-à-tête with Manoj, an enterprising tea vendor!

By Prerit Rana
Manoj, 34, is now running the teashop in Gurgaon for last two years. The building is still under construction and just half-completed. Unlike his counterparts on the main road, he doesn’t get harassed by the police and the municipality, as his shop lies in the private premises with doors opening to the outer public. He has got a room as well to stay.

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Blog Post: Chaiwala!

By Prerit Rana
I thought of having tea at Gaurav’s stall again, but, unfortunately, Gaurav’s tempo-shop was found in shambles. I could only click a picture of the broken shop, with the hope that he will come back or have left for something better.

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Blog Post: I am a sex worker and I am a migrant…

By Amrita Sharma
Last week, I went to the doctor again
She says, it’s the final stage
And that I would not live for long

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Blog Post: Zinda Kaumein Waqt ka Intezaar nahin karti!

By Amrita Sharma
If a hawker got caught then he had to pay Rs. 1200 to the Policewallah. Usually, half of the goods were also seized by the police. If it is a municipality raid, then the fine amount is higher, somewhere in the range of Rs. 5000 to 6000. The only way for the hawkers to deal with the problem was a bribe. I was told that on an average a hawker pays Rs. 3 to 4k as bribe, called hafta locally.

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Blog Post: Ho Gayi Duniya Muthhi Mein – Migrants and their Mobile Phones

By Rahul Jain
Close to 2/3rd of the migrants reported a drop in frequency of going home after owning a mobile. With help of the gadget they were able to stay in touch with family and the anxiety related to family’s well-being was reduced. Close to 1/3rd spoke with family on a daily basis. For the short distance migrants, this had a positive impact on their stability at work, making them more employable.

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Cultivating Hope in the Anything-but-Green: Mobile Creches’ Work with Children in India’s Migrant Labor Camps

By Katie Meave Murphy
During interviews and field visits to construction sites in the NCR in June and July 2011, mothers explained the reasons for bringing children to the construction site. As one mother recounted: “I used to bring my child to the site because she was only 7 months and I was breastfeeding. I had to work. I had no choice.”

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