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Posts from the ‘Issue 1/ Beyond Mumbai’ Category

Guest Editorial: The Everyday and Other Tagore

By Bhaswati Ghosh
In one of his most powerful poems (Patraput, 15), Tagore declares himself an outcast, one who has renounced the bondage of religion and ritual. He likens himself to Bauls and their search for the man of the heart, a quest to find divinity in humanity, not in external or imagined symbols. This is the other, everyday Tagore – internalized in universes that don’t often feature in scholarly discourses.

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An Interview with Sahana Bajpaie

By Bhaswati Ghosh
Sahana Bajpaie is a leading name in the realm of Rabindrasangeet singers. Brought up and educated in Santiniketan, Sahana trained in Indian classical music and Rabindra Sangeet under Bijoy Sinha, Madhumita Roy, Chitra Roy, Shyamoli Bandopadhyay, Chandan Munshi and Mita Huq (Bangladesh) among others. She speaks to Bhaswati Ghosh

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Realising Tagore through Artist-Activist, Shyamali Khastagir

By Manisha Banerjee
Coming to posters, Shyamali was the perfect ambassador for blending art with activism. Even in the prison in the USA, she made posters with her drawings and scribbled on them words of protest. These were long banners on cloth which she could hang from trees that spoke of her concern for the world.

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Tagore Utsav by Flying Birds of India

By Aseem Asha Usman
The festival is celebrated for three days in the second week of May, to coincide with the birthday of Rabindranath Tagore and held in collaboration with Jamia Schools and Department of Sculpture, Faculty of Fine Art, Jamia Millia Islamia. It is always celebrated based on themes inspired by Tagore’s philosophy, life and works. This year (2015), the theme of the Utsav was ‘Santiniketan’.

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Four Poems

By Goirick Brahmachari
Ma lost her voice the day Baba died. They had fallen in love in the winter of 1960. For years she sang and Baba sang through her.

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An Indian in England

By Ruma Chakravarti
Wilfred Owen was arguably Britain’s best war poet. Sir Rabindranath Tagore, as his mother Susan Owen addressed a letter that she wrote to Tagore in 1920, was certainly India’s finest.

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Excerpt from ‘Fall Winter Collections’

By Koral Dasgupta
For quite some days I have been watching this house every time I cross it. I thought for once I will find its occupant lazing outside on the veranda. But it didn’t quite happen and each time I killed my instinct of knocking the door and going ahead uninvited. But the house makes a statement by itself, which draws my attention and my speed naturally slows down when I am walking past.

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Guest-Editorial: Redefining Success in the Rapidly Changing Publishing World

By Lisa D. Ellis
The desire of every writer included in this issue to relate his or her successes and frustrations in the hope that in the process, their story will ultimately help them form valuable connections. In coming together in this way to share our art, we all play a meaningful part to help keep good writing alive for future generations, regardless of whether the work is read in print, electronically, or in some other form we can’t yet anticipate.

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My Journey toward Publication

By Kimberly Bunker
I’ve come to understand that getting published comes down to two main, and almost unrelated, things: 1. Good writing, and all that that entails, and 2. Connections. Of course, both are highly ambiguous and relative terms. How do you know if your writing is good enough, and if your connections are important enough?

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Advice to Novelists: Never, Never, Never Give Up!

By Kathy Brown Ramsperger
My most recent, encouraging rejection: “Although your manuscript seems a unique idea, we regret to inform you of our decision not to pursue further collaboration at this time.” How do I know that’s a personal rejection? A typo, and the words “unique idea.” That’s often the only clue you’ll get.
Yet triumphs do occur as well.

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Looking Away

By Paige Bonnivier Hassall
When I contemplate the business side of writing, I can’t help sometimes but wonder: Am I writing fiction, or playing baseball? When did literature become something to be read aloud by a sportscaster? And is my daughter doomed to inherit this prosaic world?

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Cannonballing Right Into the Deep End

By Robert Dorn
In order to keep myself writing on a regular basis and to connect with other writers, I joined a local writers group. This group, which meets monthly at the public library, challenges itself with monthly writing assignments that we share and comment on each meeting. I must admit that this North Attleboro Writer’s Group has been a significant catalyst in my writing career.

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Love What You Write and Do It With Purpose

By Caren Begun
After starting my blog, I thought that writing a book would be a good next step. However, I was working full-time and raising a baby and time was just not possible to pen a memoir, novel, or even a self-help book. I did go to a writing seminar and learned that I must really be committed to a topic: body, mind, and soul, then I would know what to write about.

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It’s Not Enough to Just Write a Great Story Anymore…

By Kanchana Banerjee
I’m fortunate that my publisher isn’t blatant about the economics of book selling. They are very polite, erudite, and yet clear. The author has to walk the long mile when it comes to marketing. Build an online profile. Focus on garnering a following through blogs, Twitter, and Facebook. QED: It’s not enough to just write a great story.

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Tough to Make it Financially—But Soul Satisfaction Counts!

By Koshy A.V.
The changing marketplace affects us in that we are on a constant selling mode, which takes our mind away from the actual process of writing. This is because one keeps trying to be visible and popular and make an impact every day, rather than write. The writer has to be always in the news and keep churning out new stuff.

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An Aspiring Writer in Wonderland

By Santosh Bakaya
Now, I realize that it is no use making haste. A manuscript should go to the publisher only when it is honed, polished, and scintillating. Bad proofreading and editing can kill a book. I have seen many an excellent book suffering dismally at the hands of self-publishing agencies that take exorbitant amounts from the writers, but do an extremely poor job.

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Keep Calm and Write

By Namrata
The Indian literary industry is yet to warm to literary agents and, hence, most of the publishing houses are open to direct submissions and their requirements are very simple. Three sample chapters, author’s bio, and a synopsis about the story that you want to narrate. Sounds simple, right? Well, that is where the twist is.

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Contents – Disability: Art and Culture (Issue 17)

Contents: Diasbility Arts and Culture (Issue 17)

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Guest Editorial – Disability Art and Culture: Of difficult questions and complex answers

By Shilpaa Anand & Nandini Ghosh
The aim of this issue was to present disabled artists’ conceptions of their art. This endeavour was undertaken keeping in mind that a disabled artist or a disabled writer’s work is received/ perceived in certain normative ways: in a paternalistic manner, the art may be attributed only to their disability; the Super Crip attitude that considers that the disabled artist has a talent using which he or she overcomes their disability; the artist’s disability may be hidden from the world under the assumption that they may not consider their disability as part of their individual identity.

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