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Posts tagged ‘Writing in Academia’

Ruminating the Field and the Pedagogy of Writing Notes

By Suchismita Chattopadhyay
Anytime somebody has to embark on a research that involves field work, the first piece of advice is that one must take extensive field notes. One must maintain a journal for recording their days on field. The advice is mainly limited to that. It is specific and vague at the same time. It is specific to the point of the researcher must make field notes every day and vague because nobody tells you what exactly constitutes a good field note. This is possibly the reason why anything and everything can become a field note.

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From Fieldnotes to Finished Text: Affect and the Labor of Care in Writing Ethnography

By Anusha Hariharan
Anthropological lore has it that A Diary in the Strictest Sense of the Term (1967) caused ripples across the north American academy when published posthumously. It was as if, suddenly a celebrated ancestor’s vulnerabilities during the period of data collection had been laid bare for the world to witness; it intruded into his status of an empirically-rooted positivist social scientist.

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Enacting Care in Writing Pedagogy: Notes from a Collaborative Exercise

By Madhura Lohokare
We exchanged notes with each other, earlier in the corridors and over chai-coffee, and later in our semi-formal parhai-likhai meetings, even as we realized that we were generating a distinct conversation about the challenges, possibilities and the overwhelming need for the teaching of writing in our classrooms.

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Mortality and Writing Pedagogy

By Durba Chattaraj
Evocative writing aimed a general audience can persuade far more than the dry prose of peer-reviewed medical research, and I was sure I was going to go with Gawande, but then there was a further development in my case. After much thought I decided to have the surgery, and gave up my butterfly-shaped thyroid, first one wing, and then the other, to an extraordinarily skilled surgeon, in a hospital perched high up on the banks of the Schuylkill River.

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The Writing Self and the Work of Care in Critical Writing Pedagogy

By Anannya Dasgupta
In the context of university classrooms to show care would mean enabling spaces and vocabulary to help students locate the sense of an embodied self in relation to others, to get students to a place where the tools of critical thinking become useful things to learn. This makes the work of teaching writing both daunting and an exactly appropriate place to begin the process of self-recovery because as it turns out writing demands an engagement and examination of the self like few other activities.

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Writing Together: Working Towards New Cultures of Writing in Academia

By Vasudha Katju
Academic writing is social. The arguments we make and ideas we debate are part of academic debates, dialogues and conversations which began long before we arrived on the scene and will continue after we depart. The norms of writing and publication that we must follow too come to us from without, and at least some of our academic training involves learning these norms.

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Notes from an Inattentive, Lumpen Professor

By Nandini Dhar
I wrote in cafes, I wrote in libraries. I got up at 4 am to write. I came back home early to write. And, even then, much to everyone’s surprise, my PhD thesis remained incomplete. Because, to tell the truth, beyond those fifteen minutes every day, I wasn’t writing my dissertation at all. I was writing poems. I was writing poems in two languages – English – and my native language, Bangla.

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Writing without Discipline: Reflections of an ‘interdisciplinary’ academic

By Swathi Shivanand
One of my most serious problems in the course of the writing was one of limit or restraint. With all the initial motivations of the thesis condensed into this one chapter, it seemed often that the scope of the chapter was vast and my abilities to limit it to specific elements less than satisfactory.

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Writing Without Arguments: An Argument Against Utility in Academic Writing

By Shantam Goyal
We recognise that our work as academic writers is not limited to producing paranoid knowledge about a single text, or to understanding the symptomatic dimension of the layers behind the wordy surface. Instead, our work can be transformative and reparative.

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Softening boundaries: Entering Academic Writing through Creative Writing

By Kumud Bhansali
Academic writing is a form of writing with its specific vocabulary and grammar, meant for audience who are participants in conversations that have been going on for a long period of time. The aim is to eventually participate in the discourse, but we also have to remind ourselves that we write first and edit later as far as the written word goes.

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A Brief and Uneven Guide to Writing Pedagogy in Higher Education in India

By Madhura Lohokare and Anannya Dasgupta
Apart from the instructors who teach writing and students who imbibe it, we need to recognise that both these sets of actors operate in the institutional setting of a university/ college, which is a material as well as a social space. How do institutions enable or hinder the emergence and consolidation of a writing pedagogy?

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