Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘South Asia’

Contents – In the Shadow of the Larger Faiths: The Minor Faiths of South Asia (Issue 27)

Contents - In the Shadow of the Larger Faiths: The Minor Faiths of South Asia (Issue 27)

Read more

Guest-Editorial – In the Shadow of the Larger Faiths: The Minor Faiths of South Asia

By Sipra Mukherjee
Minor faiths appear to be born of the needs of the people at particular junctures of history. These moments of time may be found to be marked by the birth of not one, but of many such rebellious faiths. While most of these ‘rebellions’ fade into oblivion, one or two remain, drawing strength from the injustices and the wrongs that the ‘larger’ religion has been unable to address.

Read more

Following the Sacred Graves: Image, Voice, Fragrance at the Mazars of Kolkata

By Epsita Halder
Lakshmana Sena built a mosque and khanqah for Shah Jalaluddin Tabrizi in Pandua. But mosques were a phenomenon where the state came into contact with the Sufi saints. Outside that, basically the sufi pirs were disseminating Islam through the mystical path of Sufism. As Sufi pirs from northern India were dying and being buried in Sylhet, Pandua and everywhere, their graves started to be revered as the symbol of his spiritual height.

Read more

A Report on the Asura Week: Marginalized Politics on a University Campus

By Ria De
It is in response to this immediate provocation that a group of students decided to organize the Asura Week as an expression of resistance against the increasing efforts at Hindutvization of campuses. It was also meant to create the circumstances for the university community to participate in debates and discussions on the ways in which majoritarian Hindu festivals such as the Ganesh Chaturthi, Durga Puja, Holi, Onam, and others have historically been produced as secular and national festivals by marking Dalit Bahujan festivals and icons as communal, sectarian, and primitive.

Read more

The Ravi Dassias: Punjab’s fourth Qaum

By Karthik Venkatesh
In 1926, Mangoo Ram proclaimed a new religion — Ad Dharm – for the lower castes. His initial following came from his own community, the Chamars. The following reached such sizeable numbers that it forced the colonial authorities to enumerate them as a separate religious community (qaum) distinct from Sikhs, Hindus, and Muslims in the 1931 census. They were to be Punjab’s fourth qaum and Mangoo Ram’s vision was that the Ad Dharm would eventually draw into its fold all of Punjab’s lower castes.

Read more

Being ‘bad’ Muslims in a Muslim majority state: The ‘Bedes’ of Bangladesh

By Carmen Brandt
While the majority of Bangladesh’s inhabitants have easy access to global media that might tell them how to be ‘good’ Muslims, many Bedes even today live under the simplest circumstances, in boats or plastic tents without electricity, that also do not allow them to be connected to a mosque community where they could learn the basics of Islam as prevailing locally.

Read more

The Khasi Indigenous Faith

By Esther Syiem
The philosophy of Khasi religion is reflected in the common dictum: tip briew tip Blei; kamai ϊa ka hok; and tip kur tip kha commonly known as the Divine Decree. It lays the foundation of a society that must take into account the interpenetration of the physical with the extra-physical. Its brevity may easily be mistaken for simplicity but it does not allow reduction to a few simplistic norms.

Read more

Mahatma Jotiba Phule: Satyashodhak Samaj and Sarvajanik Satya Dharma

By Rohini Mokashi-Punekar
Jotirao Phule was born into a lower caste Mali family in a Brahmin hegemonic society, about a decade after the British defeated the Peshwas in 1818. This may explain his lifelong resistance to caste and gender hierarchy, which was fuelled and given shape by his exposure to Western radical literature and missionary writings and his involvement in contemporary Indian reform movement in the Bombay Presidency. Convinced that only secular education could liberate the oppressed classes, he began a school for untouchable girls in 1848, an unprecedented social initiative, followed by several others for untouchable boys, girls of all castes and a night school for working class adults.

Read more

Drifts of Defiance: The Kartabhaja Sect in Bengal

By Md. Dilwar Hossain
The story goes that Aul Chand (birth date unknown, died 1769), a Sufi Fakir, founded the Kartabhaja sect at Ghoshpara, an area inhabited largely by impoverished Muslims and Hindus of the lowly castes. This was in the Nadia district of West Bengal. His first disciple Ramsarn Pal was a Sadgop, a caste of the lower order. The message of love and tolerance attracted the lower class people greatly dissatisfied by the rigid nature of established religions.

Read more

The Bauls of Bengal

By Aratrika Bhattacharya
Comprising of members from the Vaishnava Hindus and Sufi Muslims, Bauls occupy a unique position as devotees, mystics, naturalists, tantric and wanderers in India and Bangladesh. Baul–Fakirs are identified by their unique clothing and music, with an ektara and bowl for alms in hands. Clubbed, in colonial accounts, as subordinate categories within the larger ‘Hindu’ identity as Bairagi, then as Vaishnava and later on as Baolas, Bauls were “held in very low estimation by respectable Hindus.”

Read more

The Study of Frescoes on the Walls of the Pothimala Gurudwara

By Srishti Pandey Sharma
The Gurudwara of Pothimala is situated in the village of Guru Harsahai, District Firozpur in Punjab. The village is named after the elder son of Guru Jiwan Mal Sodhi who was the fourth direct descendent of the fourth Sikh guru, Guru Ram Das (1534-1581). The Gurudwara derives its name from the fact that Guru Nanak’s personal Pothi (Small book) and Mala (rosary) are housed in this religious place/Gurudwara. The uniqueness of this Gurudwara lies in the fact that this place of worship blurs religious boundaries and there is a coming together of people from the three distinct identities of Hinduism, Sikhism and Islam.

Read more

The Cult of Sona Ray in the Koch-Rajbanshi Community

By Preetinicha Barman Prodhani
The god, Sona Ray, is the tiger deity, who protects the faithful from the tiger. The Koch-Rajbanshis were rich with their agricultural lands and herds of cattle. But the threat of the tiger always haunted the farmers and the herdsmen. This threat of an unknown fate haunted them when they went to their fields. The worship of Sona Ray could assure them protection from this impending fear. Traditionally, this ritual was carried out by a group of young herdsmen.

Read more

A Radiant Faith: Mahima Dharma of Odisha

By Ishita Banerjee-Dube
Mahima Swami’s deification and his faith’s success rested on his simple message worked out in radical practices. The message advocated belief in a formless, all pervasive, indescribable/beyond writing (Alekh) Absolute who has created the world out of his mahima (radiance/glory) and was accessible to all through pure devotion. This rendered redundant temples and rituals, priests and pilgrimage, and interrogated complex ritual and social hierarchies of caste and kingship, and the role of Brahmans as mediators between gods and men.

Read more

Contents: Jewish-Muslim Relations in South Asia (Issue 21)

Contents: Jewish-Muslim Relations in South Asia (Issue 21)

Read more

Guest-Editorial: Jewish-Muslim Relations in South Asia: An Introduction

By Navras Jaat Aafreedi
The only places in the world where Jews were not in a predominantly Christian or Muslim society were China and India, which are also the only two countries in the world where they never suffered persecution and discrimination. Chinese Jewry ceased to exist long ago as a result of their complete and total assimilation. However, Indian Jews not only managed to exist, but thrived in India and came to enjoy superbly cordial relations with their non-Jewish neighbours including Muslims.

Read more

Religious Syncretism and Jewish-Muslim Dialogue in India and Beyond

By Amit Ranjan
The Jew-Muslim conflict is the talk of the time. It needs to be probed, however, whether it is a religious conflict or a geopolitical one. Often, in the modern world, terms are easily conflated by vested interests to fan prejudices and form alliances on some other lines than what the real issues at hand are. A direct counterpoint to the conflict mentioned above is the Jewish-Muslim relations in South Asia.

Read more

South Asian Holocaust Educator: A Personal Journey

By Mehnaz M. Afridi
As a first generation Pakistani, a child of Indian refugees, I was raised with pride to be a Muslim and a Pakistani – Pak-istan, literally translated as “the land of the pure”. My experience of the partition is limited, even non-existent, but my parents’ memories remain engraved in my mind for better or worse. The story of my paternal grandfather who lost his clothing business in Aligarh, India and when he arrived in Karachi, Pakistan, his small saved fortune was stolen from his room.

Read more

A Story of the Holocaust and the AIDS Epidemic: The romance of an Indian Muslim Freedom Fighter and a Lithuanian Jewish Woman

By Kenneth X. Robbins & John Mcleod
The horrors of the Holocaust were to touch Hamied and Luba directly. In June 1941, Nazi troops occupied Wilno, and almost immediately began the extermination of the city’s Jews. Luba’s siblings survived: her brother Zorach was working for Hamied in Bombay, and her Communist sisters had escaped to Moscow before the coming of the Germans.

Read more