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Posts tagged ‘Santiniketan’

Contents: The Everyday and Other Tagore (Issue 19)

Contents: The Everyday and Other Tagore (Issue 19)

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Guest Editorial: The Everyday and Other Tagore

By Bhaswati Ghosh
In one of his most powerful poems (Patraput, 15), Tagore declares himself an outcast, one who has renounced the bondage of religion and ritual. He likens himself to Bauls and their search for the man of the heart, a quest to find divinity in humanity, not in external or imagined symbols. This is the other, everyday Tagore – internalized in universes that don’t often feature in scholarly discourses.

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An Interview with Sahana Bajpaie

By Bhaswati Ghosh
Sahana Bajpaie is a leading name in the realm of Rabindrasangeet singers. Brought up and educated in Santiniketan, Sahana trained in Indian classical music and Rabindra Sangeet under Bijoy Sinha, Madhumita Roy, Chitra Roy, Shyamoli Bandopadhyay, Chandan Munshi and Mita Huq (Bangladesh) among others. She speaks to Bhaswati Ghosh

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Realising Tagore through Artist-Activist, Shyamali Khastagir

By Manisha Banerjee
Coming to posters, Shyamali was the perfect ambassador for blending art with activism. Even in the prison in the USA, she made posters with her drawings and scribbled on them words of protest. These were long banners on cloth which she could hang from trees that spoke of her concern for the world.

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Tagore Utsav by Flying Birds of India

By Aseem Asha Usman
The festival is celebrated for three days in the second week of May, to coincide with the birthday of Rabindranath Tagore and held in collaboration with Jamia Schools and Department of Sculpture, Faculty of Fine Art, Jamia Millia Islamia. It is always celebrated based on themes inspired by Tagore’s philosophy, life and works. This year (2015), the theme of the Utsav was ‘Santiniketan’.

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Tagore’s Association with Jews

By Navras Jaat Aafreedi
Rabindranath Tagore interceded on behalf of Aronson twice when he was threatened with internment during the Second World War because of his being a German national in spite of his having been scrapped of his German citizenship by the Nazis.

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Four Poems

By Goirick Brahmachari
Ma lost her voice the day Baba died. They had fallen in love in the winter of 1960. For years she sang and Baba sang through her.

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An Indian in England

By Ruma Chakravarti
Wilfred Owen was arguably Britain’s best war poet. Sir Rabindranath Tagore, as his mother Susan Owen addressed a letter that she wrote to Tagore in 1920, was certainly India’s finest.

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Tagore, the liberal anti-national patriot

By Raj Shekhar Sen
It can be said that Tagore’s pride came from not a sense of inferiority, which plagues the modern nationalist, but from an overwhelming confidence in the idea that Eastern ethos can stand up to Western modernity or as some would like to call it, the Western culture.

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How to Draw Rabindranath

By Sumana Roy
I’ve seen many draw Rabindranath.
Like Rabindranath, they are now anonymous.

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Excerpt from ‘Fall Winter Collections’

By Koral Dasgupta
For quite some days I have been watching this house every time I cross it. I thought for once I will find its occupant lazing outside on the veranda. But it didn’t quite happen and each time I killed my instinct of knocking the door and going ahead uninvited. But the house makes a statement by itself, which draws my attention and my speed naturally slows down when I am walking past.

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Relationships (Jogajog): Grandma and I

By Sumallya Mukhopadhay
The only book she kept at her bedside was Jogajog. One day, she signalled me to read it. I read her some fifty pages from the book. I never realized when she had gone to sleep. When I did, I switched off the bed-lamp. Her face, as I saw it that night, reflected the word, melancholy.

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Recalling my Tagore on a rainy day

By Shouvik Banerjee
An afternoon sky sought refuge in the wet, pregnant landscape. Santiniketan must have conceived ‘Meghdut’ in such an afternoon; as it must have quenched the thirst of some weary lark; as it must have moved to the breeze of some magnanimous shade by the lonely path.

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