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Posts tagged ‘Muslim’

The Tawa’ifs of Lucknow

By Nishat Haider
When the court and capital of Awadh was shifted from Faizabad to Lucknow by Asaf al-Daulah in 1775, Lucknow became the locus of tawaif-bazi (courtesan culture). In his book Tarrikh-e-Farahbaksh, Mohammad Faiz Baksh observed that the decline of Mughal Empire in the last quarter of the eighteenth century led to the mass exodus of female performers, tawaifs, nautch girls, the poets and artists from Delhi to Lucknow. Ensconced in the lavish houses in the bazaars of Chowk and Qaiserbagh, the tawa’ifs established themselves as a notable group of women in the eighty-odd years that the Awadh dynasty had Lucknow as its capital city, under the extravagant patronage of the Nawab, the connoisseurs of art, noblemen, merchants, and the elite. The tawa’ifs are not simply prostitutes or entertainers.

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An Islamic Seminary of Lucknow: Cloister or College?

By Christopher Taylor
In modern India, critics of madrasa education have termed it a ‘medieval’ and disorganized form of learning with little emphasis on job skills or modern subjects. Yet, existing urban madrasas such as Nadwa in Lucknow are accepting more students every year and new ones are opening in even more remote villages. This growth suggests that a sizable number of Muslims do not view madrasas as part of a burdensome past to be cast away in order to join India’s modern future. For many people I spoke with in Lucknow during my two years living there, Nadwa is still a valid route for educational advancement.

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Conversations with Two Muslim Friends in Lucknow

By Akhilesh Dixit
A strong supporter of education, Salim bhai keeps on asking vegetablesellers and other small shopkeepers to send their children to school rather than let them loiter at their shops. He believes that once educated, these kids will have the ability to question the misdeeds of our political and religious leaders who have turned the community into a mere vote bank. He sums up, “Ab main maulviyon ke ilm ki to izzat karta hoon magar unki nahi” (Now I don’t respect the clerics. I just respect knowledge).

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The Attitudes of Lucknow’s Muslims towards Jews, Israel, and Zionism

By Navras Jaat Aafreedi
While a Holocaust film retrospective, the first ever in South Asia, was in progress at two universities in Lucknow - the Bābāsāhéb Bhīmrāo Ambédkar University and the University of Lucknow - in September – October 2009, the two most popular Urdu daily newspapers there, Rāshtriya Sahāra and Aag, published stories denying the Holocaust. The articles were largely based on the arguments made by the well-known Holocaust deniers, viz., David Irving, Harry Elmer Barnes, David Hoggan, Paul Ressinier, and Arthur R. Butz.

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“Lost in Transition”? Muslim Middle Class in Lucknow

By Stefanie Strulik
Muslim middle class started to flourish again with the oil boom in the Middle East and labour migration and returning remittances. The ‘new’ Muslim middle class at times expressed its pursuit for upward social mobility in the form of a new religiosity and conservative understanding of Islam, as acquired during labour migration in the Gulf or Saudi Arabia.

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Narendra Modi as PM: What It Means to Me

By Jinju S.
I silently cried as I read about the pregnant woman whose belly was slit open and the foetus thrown into the fire, about the thousands raped, slaughtered and burned for a crime they had not the least association with.

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Secularism in Crisis: The Fate of ‘Muslims’

By Abdul Matin
The projection of Narendra Modi as the Prime Ministerial candidate of India is not only against the idea of India but also against the basic ethos of democracy, secularism, fraternity, social justice, gender, and minority rights.

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An Interview with Mr. Asaduddin Owaisi

By Abu Saleh
An Interview with Mr. Asaduddin Owaisi, President, All India Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen.

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Contents – Beyond Mumbai, 2012: Indian Muslims and the Way Forward (Issue 1)

First Issue Index

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Editorial: Beyond Assam and Mumbai, 2012

By Mary Ann Chacko & Mosarrap H. Khan
Despite the significant difference in perspectives, there seems to be an agreement among the writers about a few basic issues: Indian Muslims face appalling socio-economic challenges; the Indian state has overtly or covertly failed to address their needs; Indian Muslims must learn to protest within the framework of democratic norms.

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