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Posts tagged ‘Migration’

A journey across cities: A re-encounter with the women of ‘Dhobi Ghat’

By Saumya B Verma
While I grapple with my own realities and memory-making in the new city, I identify with both Shai and Yasmin but only in parts. I continue my encounters with the city in both the domestic and professional realms – doing rapid rounds of groceries, cooking copious amounts of food, cleaning and washing, watching neighbours shovel their driveways and on other sunny days visiting film festivals, attending courses at the university, volunteering in the community, reading new authors, making new friends!

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Dis-placing the Heteropatriarchal Gaze: The Female Body, Love, and Desire in Mohanraj’s ‘Bodies in Motion’

By Kaustav Bakshi
This article focuses on a Sri Lankan expatriate novel, Mary Anne Mohanraj’s Bodies in Motion (2005), a family saga that moves between Sri Lanka and the United States, spanning a timeline of six decades. Told in twenty interconnected short stories, the intense dramatic saga of the Kandiahs and the Vallipurams is built on a series of family secrets that unravels myths of purity, happiness, romantic coupling, parent-child relationship, and sexual desire.

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‘Chidiyon da chamba’: Leaving Home and Making Home: A Study of Marital Displacement

By Debamitra Kar
The woman’s sense of home is a family-oriented concept in which her individual identity is deeply compromised to establish herself as a mother or care-giver. Her unpaid labour, mostly translated as love, is the pre-requisite to maintain her seeming position of importance in the household. The metanarrative of patriarchy is internalised, which leads them to unknowingly use the words ‘normal’, ‘adjustment’, ‘security’, ‘belonging’.

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The ‘Burned Star’: Life Sketches of Rosie, the First Malayalam Movie Actress (1903-1928)

By Vineeth Mathoor
The Rosie episode reminds that life was not easy for a Dalit woman in colonial Travancore in 1930s as well. While the numerous waves of socio-religious reform movements and the spread of communist movements are celebrated even today as factors responsible for Kerala’s modernization and success in various level of life in independent India, what exactly these movements ensured regarding questions of spatial freedom, recognition, and displacement in the region remain unanswered.

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Women in Conflict: Multiple Marginalities through Displacement

By Subhajit Sengupta
The #metoo campaign saw women across the world taking down powerful men and calling them out for what was for long being accepted as 'men’s privilege’. But the real change will happen when this phenomenon trickles down to the downtrodden. Thus the only hope that one is left with is that the ‘trickle down theory’ will not be as laggard socially as it has been economically.

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Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home

By Mahuya Paul
When I first moved to Bangalore almost two decades ago, I loved the essence of the garden city – warm people, cool weather, and very metro. For some reason, I did not feel left out as you do when you visit a new city, alone. And I say this because when I visited Delhi the first time, I wanted to run away from the place because it was so hostile. I just assumed that the rest of the metros would be equally unwelcome. But Bangalore was a pleasant surprise!

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Defining my life and art through displacement

By Lapdiang Syiem
Having spent three and a half years of my life training at the National School of Drama in New Delhi, I struggled to make sense of what the theatre meant to me. I did not grow up in an environment of any performance tradition as such. I come from an oral tradition of myths and legends that have nothing in common with the two Indian epics: the Ramayana and the Mahabharata.

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Contents – Inland Labor Migration in India (Issue 9)

Contents: Inland Labor Migration in India (Issue 9)

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Guest Editorial: Inland labour migration in India: Patterns of the phenomenon and critical possibilities

By Soma Chatterjee
Collectively, the contributions point towards a few broad themes. Indian cities, magnets for migrant workers, are, at the same time, apathetic, if not hostile towards them. Migrant workers are shorn of basic rights to education and health, only to increase their exploitability. It seems that it is their bottomless marginality that fuels India’s growth story. Further, it seems lack of recognition at both source and destination is an issue for migrant workers.

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The Invisible City Makers: Of migration and migrant workers in India

By Amrita Sharma & Rajiv Khandewal
The story of economic growth in India is essentially the story of labor migration and of migrants, who leave the increasingly poor villages with a decadent farm economy in search of better lives. They build resplendent city economies but fail to get a share of the riches; much worse, many struggle for a dignified human existence – for shelter, subsidized food, healthcare, and education – in the same cities they build.

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Book Review: Aman Sethi’s A Free Man: A True Story of Life and Death in Delhi

By Mosarrap H. Khan
While narrativizing the social biography of his respondent, Sethi does not subscribe to the standard triumph-of-the-underdog narrative. Rather, Sethi’s realist depiction is suffused with pessimism, resulting from an understanding that Ashraf’s waywardness will never allow him to live a life of bourgeois respectability.

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A tête-à-tête with Manoj, an enterprising tea vendor!

By Prerit Rana
Manoj, 34, is now running the teashop in Gurgaon for last two years. The building is still under construction and just half-completed. Unlike his counterparts on the main road, he doesn’t get harassed by the police and the municipality, as his shop lies in the private premises with doors opening to the outer public. He has got a room as well to stay.

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Blog Post: Chaiwala!

By Prerit Rana
I thought of having tea at Gaurav’s stall again, but, unfortunately, Gaurav’s tempo-shop was found in shambles. I could only click a picture of the broken shop, with the hope that he will come back or have left for something better.

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Blog Post: I am a sex worker and I am a migrant…

By Amrita Sharma
Last week, I went to the doctor again
She says, it’s the final stage
And that I would not live for long

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