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Posts tagged ‘India’

“We want freedom” ~ Kashmir, a photo essay

By Nitasha Kaul
The infrastructure in Kashmir is poor and reflects the twin realities of conflict and corruption. Indian soldiers stand with guns right beside slogans that say ‘Indian Dogs Go Back’, or more often ‘Go India, Go Back’. Even the footsoldiers of Indian occupation generally understand that this is a ‘political problem’, which cannot be solved militarily.

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The Citizen and the Constructed Other − Bangladeshi Migrants in West Bengal

By Anindita Chakrabarty
Migration from Bangladesh to India at various epochs is characterized by dynamism and complexity. The divide needs to be contextualized within the centuries-old shared history, an acrimonious partition of territory in 1947 on the basis of religious identity, and the division of Pakistan in 1971, and, subsequently, the emergence of a smaller, less secure state of Bangladesh, surrounded on its three sides by an assertive regional power like India.

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Bureaucratizing “choice”: Longing, belonging, and not knowing in the India-Bangladesh exchange of enclaves

By Sahana Ghosh
Since the 2011 survey that conducted a census in all the enclaves, there had been steady rumors about an impending resolution, including the possibility of migrating to India permanently. With that desired future flashing before their eyes, however unknown, the brothers even decided against investing any money in renovating their dilapidated house. The two brothers had taken leave from their contractual job in a steel rod manufacturing company to be present in Banshpachai during the survey and arrive at a consensus within the family.

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Remembering a Refugee City

By Debjani Sengupta
By 1951, my father had managed to find himself a livelihood; he had reclaimed the city. When he first came to the city in 1940, he had lived in a ‘mess-bari’ with his elder brother who worked at the Imperial Library in Central Avenue. But he had not taken to Kolkata much and had decided to leave. However, the city had marked him out as its own. By 1949, the last of his family had come over to this side, never to go back. My grandfather was heartbroken to leave Naranyangunj and complained that the fish and vegetables never tasted the same on this side.

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Towards A Kindlier Self: Analysing Partition through Ashwin Sanghi’s ‘The Sialkot Saga’

By Priyanka Chatterjee
Ashwin Sanghi unfolds the complex intricacies of the ‘self’ in The Sialkot Saga, where the narrative constantly shifts from myth to history to present day India to fantasy. The action of the novel begins with a horrific description of Partition riots and moves to unfurl the emergence of India of the present times with its tales of progress and regress. The narrative is continuously interspersed with moments from Indian history, ranging from 250 BCE Pataliputra during the reign of Ashoka to 1833 Lahore of Maharaja Ranjit Singh.

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Revisiting Saadat Hasan Manto: Lessons in Secularism and Humanism

By Sana Khan
One idea that Manto tried to rescue and which we must rescue today was the idea of secularism. He saw the notion of the secular not as categorically a right of the state but as a vitality of a culture. The significance of Manto in the Indian context is telling if one can go beyond secularism as a politically correct concept.

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Post-Partition (1947-58) Refugee-hood in Bengal – A Critical Reading of Published Autobiographies

By Ekata Bakshi
The Dalit refugee accounts reveal that most of the lower-caste refugees were the last to leave. The more fortunate ones were able to reach the borders completely penniless and face the inhuman conditions of refugee camps while the less fortunate were never recognised by the government as refugees for crossing the border later and have been completely written out of memory. The horrors of living in Sealdah Station and later in a refugee camp have also featured frequently in Dalit refugee accounts and have been described in detail by Manoranjan Byapari and Jatinbala.

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Rising Dalit assertion to counter dominant Brahmanical political narratives

By Vidya Bhushan Rawat
While the political parties failed and particularly those claiming to represent the Dalits keep disappointing, the positive sign is that Ambedkarite youths are not ready to wait endlessly facing injustices. The huge protest that India saw in the aftermath of Rohith Vemula’s death and the subsequent flogging of Dalits in Una and violence against Dalits in Saharanpur has also put the political parties on alert that they should not take them for granted.

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Revisiting Abdullah Hussein’s ‘The Weary Generations’: Politics, Poetics, and Partition

By Raza Naeem
The novel may be read on three levels: as an account of events revolving around the partition of India in 1947; as a description of the politics and sociology of undivided Punjab, with its attendant system of feudalism and patriarchy; and a love story which begins, thrives and eventually falls with the fate of British colonialism in India itself.

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The Remains of Home: Remembering Partition through the Trials and Travels of Objects

By Sohini Chakraborty
Objects and artefacts are tangible remains that link people to past events by attaching a sensory experience to history. What moves in times of war and what gets left behind to be recollected in fond remembrance becomes a hypothetical question when considered in abstraction. Whether they would be precious collections treasured over a lifetime or basic necessities that might serve some practical use in the future was a decision undertaken in moments that had no precedence and provided no possible pattern.

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Photo-Essay: The Delhi within Delhi

By Jayshree Shukla
I hear the verses of Khusrau ring in my ears as I wander the by-lanes of the Nizamuddin Basti. I revel in the splendour of the Mughal palaces and mosques bequeathed to the city by emperors like Humayun and Shah Jahan. There are a million stories to be told and a million waiting to be heard in the streets and bazaars of Shahjahanabad. With my pictures, I capture some of them.

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Jeene Nahin Doonga: India’s Persistent Partitions

By Bhupinder Singh
I was 16 when two major political events happened: the first was the Indian army’s assault on the Harmandir Sahib, and the second was Mrs. Indira Gandhi’s assassination by two of her security men. Even then, I realized that Mrs. Gandhi’s assassination was historic, so much that one of the only two full editions of newspapers I have saved in my archives is dated November 1, 1984, which published the news of her assassination.

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The Last Nail

By John Dayal
Narendra Modi feels empowered and now has the support system in place. The election of his men as President and Vice President may well be the last nails in the series of planks that have gone into making the structure of the Rashtra of their dreams.

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Divyang: The Latest Frontier

By Nandini Ghosh
In recent times, the state has wasted no time in propagating and legitimising the use of the term Divyang, to designate disabled people literally as having divine body parts or being imbued with divinity as compensation for physical impairment. The word Divyang invests bodies with holiness and intends to change social attitudes towards disabled people but ends up reinforcing the negative attitudes that construct disabled people as evil and monstrous in the religio-cultural ideologies.

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Partitioning “Us” and “Them”: The politics of othering

By Sabiha Farhat
Abetted by politicians and a complicit state machinery, nearly 4,000 Sikhs were hacked, burnt, stabbed to death in Delhi alone, women and children included. This was the first time I realised that Hindus and Sikhs were of different religious identities. I knew Muslims and Christians were ‘separate’ identities but 1984 proved that ‘Sikhs’ were ‘different’ from Hindus too.

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Contents: India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler (Issue 31)

Contents: India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler (Issue 31)

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Contributors

Contents - India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler (Issue 31)

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India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler: An Introduction

By Navras Jaat Aafreedi
It is quite well known that Adolf Hitler enjoys immense popularity in India as evident from his omnipresent autobiography, Mein Kamf, and memorabilia. Much has already been written to find an explanation for it. What has never been done is a whole collection of articles focused on it and tracing his popularity to India’s response to the Holocaust as it happened and ever since. Even if Hitler’s popularity in India cannot be attributed to Nazism in the country yet, it cannot be dismissed simply as an obsession with and a craving for strong leadership.

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“Can the Jews resist this organized and shameless persecution?”: Gandhi’s Response to the Holocaust

By Shimon Lev
Gandhi presented his demanding suggestion to the European Jews to adopt his Satyagraha strategy in order to resist the Nazi type of racist violence. This harsh demand raised a variety of responses. The most known critics were the philosopher, Martin Buber, and the American Jewish leader, Judea Magnes. Both argued that the conditions and circumstances in Nazi Germany were so extreme that there was no possibility of implementing Satyagraha against Hitler’s regime.

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Man against Time: Savitri Devi and the Hitler Avatar

By Jyotika Mansata
Savitri Devi first decided to come to India in 1932, while writing her doctoral thesis. Having been influenced by National Socialist ideas since the Putsch of 1923, Savitri Devi saw India as the only land whose religion proclaimed Aryans to be the foremost race. Hinduism as a religion was, in her view, perfectly compatible with the weltanschauung of National Socialism, and she hoped to preach National Socialism to the Indians (or at least the Aryan Indians).

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What India Learns about Hitler and the Holocaust

By Anubhav Roy
In 1988, the most familiar Indian edition of the Mein Kampf was first pushed into circulation by Delhi’s Jaico Publishing House. By 2010, it sold its 100,000th copy. Today, of the eleven country-specific branches of Amazon.com, only India’s sub-portal features the Nazi bible amongst its list of top ten bestselling biographies. The trend, notably, is not exclusively elitist. Translated vernacular renditions of the Mein Kampf command their own readership.

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Holocaust in the Indian Urdu Press

By Md. Muddassir Quamar
Exclusive coverage of Holocaust in the Urdu press is not frequent and largely comes within the context of Israeli-Palestinian conflict whereby Israel is portrayed as a usurper and occupying state that was illegitimately imposed on Palestinians by the colonial powers. Significantly, criticism of Israel is colored in religious undertone so much so that Jews are at times referred to as the divinely ‘condemned’ community. Prolonged Palestinian statelessness and sense of victimhood evoke emotional reaction in the Urdu press.

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Indian Muslim Denial of the Holocaust: Who are these Muslims?

By Ambreen Agha
While we discuss anti-Semitism found in the Christian world, it is equally important to address the issue of Holocaust denial in the Muslim world that appears to be more a result of political frustration that theological. Based on an ethnographic account, the Muslim responses presented in this paper highlight that the class factor has a major role to play in analysing responses to the Holocaust.

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Hitler in Hindi Press: International political cartoon in a Hindi periodical

By Prabhat Kumar
In this essay, I have selected some cartoons, featuring Hitler and his Nazi Germany, which were reproduced from different international magazines in Vishvamitra (1933), a Hindi literary-political monthly, published from Calcutta. Literally, it means friend of the world. The journal’s circulation figure was around 2,500. Vishvamitra, in comparison with other contemporary Hindi literary journals, devoted more number of pages to cover international politics.

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Holocaust and Hitler in Hindi

By Navras Jaat Aafreedi
The very fact that the Delhi-based Hindi publishing house, Hindi Sahitya Sadan, published a biography of Hitler in 2013 as part of the same series, under which it brought out biographies of Bhagat Singh, Prithviraj Chauhan, Haqeeqat Rai, Swami Vivekananda, Sri Krishna, Ram Prasad Bismil, Rani Lakshmi Bai, Swami Dyananda Saraswati, Maharana Pratap, Shivaji, Chandrasekhar Azad, Madanlal Dhingra and Udham Singh, hints at how it sees him in line with them and perhaps perceives him as a great leader.

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