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Posts tagged ‘IELTS’

Contents: Study Abroad (Issue 15)

Contents - Study Abroad (Issue 15)

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Guest Editorial: Study Abroad

By Rajdeep Guha
In recent years, we have seen how in India, students who score as high as 90% in their school leaving exams do not get a seat in their college of choice. There is an unnecessary burden of clearing various entrance exams to get an admission into engineering and medical colleges. Thanks to this immense competition, Indian students, who can afford to live abroad and study, migrate to the developed world. A foreign degree often becomes the passport to success for students from the developing and underdeveloped nations.

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SPAIN, Marking Excellence in Higher Education

By Adrián Gutiérrez and Alejandra Garcia Fuertes
Infrastructure wise, Spain is second to none. World class libraries, lab facilities, housing and accommodation, recreational clubs for students and facilities for the differently abled can be found in every Spanish institute of higher learning. For non-Spanish speaking countries such as India, there are English taught Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes. Normally, each university specifies on their webpage the total or partially offered degrees in a foreign language.

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‘Universitying’ in Kuwait

By Abid Akbar Vali
The American University of Kuwait is a sister college of Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. Dartmouth is the international partner institution to AUK as defined by the Private Universities Council of the State of Kuwait (Resolution no. PUC (5/21-2/2005). Dartmouth and AUK have worked closely together since 2003, when the two institutions signed a Memorandum of Understanding that facilitated a series of advisory, consultative, and cooperative projects.

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Living and Studying in Japan

By Cy Elza Mathews
There are many, many universities in Japan. Tokyo alone has over one hundred (though some of these focus only on specific fields of study). The Japanese government has recently set up the “Global 30 Project”: thirty universities committed to providing MA and PhD courses taught entirely in English. Many other universities also provide such courses for international students.

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New Zealand university education − a gateway to success

By Wayne Angus
New Zealand provides a university system which is consistent and high in quality. All universities are internationally ranked and provide good study and career outcomes for students. New Zealand is a safe and affordable destination with favourable government policies supporting work and residence outcomes.

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Higher Education in The Netherlands: Setting a new benchmark for International Students

By Laura Smit
As the Dutch government tries to keep successful graduates in the country, it is possible to extend the residence permit for 1 more year after graduation. Newly graduated young people can spend this 1 year looking for a job. Many graduates use this year doing internships, visit job fairs, go on interviews or visit other European cities in their search for a good opportunity to start off their professional careers.

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An Interview with Meenakshi Batra

By Rajdeep Guha
I would highly recommend Ireland for Indian students for undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral studies. The quality of professors is world class and so is the education. Irish and Indians have many things in common and mix well together. There is an Indian society in UCC which is very strong and many Irish participate in all the functions and celebrations. The environment is superb with safety and loads of fun.

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Pursuing a Ph.D. Abroad

By Manaf Kottakkunnummal
South Africa is a country of contradictions. Johannesburg, where I live now, is a nice city, except when things go elusive for a while, as visible with the incidences of Xenophobia in April this year. When I arrived in 2013, I met a lot of friendly people in and out of my university. Unlike in New Delhi, I felt more at home here. I could travel, and spend a lot of time reading. I also got a new life; new chances to experiment with a new place, and to rebuild my identity, and personality.

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An Interview with Aashima Sethi

By Rajdeep Guha
One of the main advantages of studying in the US is the world class infrastructure that almost every American university offers. Coupled with that, a student can learn from renowned teachers who most often are acclaimed researchers themselves. Additionally, American degrees are respected and recognised worldwide and, hence, students can practically tap the entire job market in the world after they complete their degree.

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An Interview with Dr. Kiranmoy Das

By Rajdeep Guha
The thing I love the most in American education is the opportunity of getting dual degrees. Say for example, I can go for undergraduate training with majors in “mathematics” and “economics”. Someone might go for a B.A. degree with “political science” and “history”. I know one of my professors who completed his undergraduate program with majors in “mathematics”, “statistics”, “economics” and “Spanish”.

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An Interview with Sushmita Sircar

By Mosarrap H. Khan
In this audio interview, Mosarrap H. Khan speaks to Sushmita Sircar. Sushmita completed an undergrad from the State University of New York, Buffalo. Currently, she is pursuing a doctoral research at the Department of English, New York University.

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My Research Journey

By Mahmood Kooria
Growing up in a village of Kerala, even an Indian university such as Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) was beyond my educational imaginations. But once I got admission there in 2009 to complete a Master’s at the Centre for Historical Studies, my confidence increased. Yet, I was not that confident to apply to a foreign university, although it has been a silent dream for some years.

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Tips for Applying Abroad for a Doctoral Degree

By Anonymous
One of the things I did while I was in India preparing for applications to Canada was to send my tentative proposal to the top experts in my field in various Canadian departments. I had little expectation that they would respond but nearly 8 out 10 profs did and with several important suggestions that helped me fine-tune my proposal.

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All you wanted to know about a great Statement of Purpose

By Chitrita Chaudhary
The Statement of Purpose or SoP is one of the most important documents that go with your application. Universities ask students to provide an SoP so that the former can judge the student’s level of motivation and the desire to excel in the particular study programme. Hence, a good SoP should always reflect clarity of thought – why the student wants to pursue a Bachelor’s, Master’s or Ph.D. The student should be able to substantiate his/her short and long term goals.

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Model Statement of Purpose

By Anonymous
The Department of Industrial Engineering at X University, guided by the finest faculty in industrial statistics in the world, especially caters to my interest by providing high quality course work in Operational Research and Industrial Engineering. The fact that students passing out from X University are among the best in the world is another motivation for me.

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How to write a winning Letter of Recommendation?

By Rajdeep Guha
A letter of recommendation is very important when it comes to applying to universities for a Bachelor’s, Master’s or a Ph.D. In fact, some Ivy League universities such as Harvard and Yale emphasize more on the letters of recommendation that the student submits than on his/her SAT/GRE scores.

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Some thoughts on overcoming the hiccups of student life in North America

By Rajdeep Guha
To begin with, I would always advise an international student to seek the guidance of the international student adviser. Almost every Canadian and American university has an international student adviser, who works closely with students every day and knows virtually everything about the campus and the local area.

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Intersections of Higher Education and Student Migration to the West

By Soma Chatterjee
International students have come to be prized commodities. Typically, in the post World War II era, international students would head towards the United States as the traditional destination, a trend continuing till early 2000s.[3] As the global race for skill heated up and states embarked on aggressive recruitment strategies, this scenario started shifting.

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