Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Holocaust’

Contents – Hatred and Mass Violence: Lessons from History (Issue 49)

Contents - Hatred and Mass Violence: Lessons from History (Issue 49)

Read more

Contributors

Contributors

Read more

Guest-Editorial: Our Struggle against Hatred and Mass Violence

By Navras J. Aafreedi
In spite of all our efforts, we have failed to end mass violence. There are, of course, a number of reasons for this failure of ours, ranging from the arms industry to the concept of state sovereignty which poses a big obstacle when it comes to international intervention with the aim of stopping the occurrence of genocide or ending an ongoing genocide. Along with prevention, several other issues remain highly problematic, such as, conflicting narratives, remembrance and memorialization, some of the aspects to which this issue of Café Dissensus draws our attention.

Read more

Conflicting Historical Narratives and the Perpetuation of Trauma

By Reuven Firestone
Coming soon...

Read more

Holocaust, Propaganda, and the Distortion of History in the Former Soviet Space

By Charles E. Ehrlich
Since the USSR had integrated locals in occupied territories as its own citizens during the period before the German invasion in 1941, they ended up with additional consequences. First, that the local (non-Jewish) populations became victims of two occupations. Second, they themselves collaborated varyingly with the Russians and the Germans. Where they collaborated with the Russians between 1939 and 1941, they had to cleanse their guilt, which made killing Jews for the Germans easier.

Read more

The Failure of Secular Publics and the Rise of the Jewish Religious Public in Nathan Englander’s ‘For the Relief of Unbearable Urges’

By Fuzail Asar Siddiqi
Englander questions the thesis whether it is possible to participate as equals in a public setting, as subjects that are nothing more than the rational arguments that they posit. This form of abstraction can be problematic because it assumes one’s participation in the public sphere as devoid of any recourse to arguments based on religious resources unless purged of its religious significance.

Read more

Contents: India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler (Issue 31)

Contents: India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler (Issue 31)

Read more

Contributors

Contents - India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler (Issue 31)

Read more

India’s Response to the Holocaust and its Perception of Hitler: An Introduction

By Navras Jaat Aafreedi
It is quite well known that Adolf Hitler enjoys immense popularity in India as evident from his omnipresent autobiography, Mein Kamf, and memorabilia. Much has already been written to find an explanation for it. What has never been done is a whole collection of articles focused on it and tracing his popularity to India’s response to the Holocaust as it happened and ever since. Even if Hitler’s popularity in India cannot be attributed to Nazism in the country yet, it cannot be dismissed simply as an obsession with and a craving for strong leadership.

Read more

“Can the Jews resist this organized and shameless persecution?”: Gandhi’s Response to the Holocaust

By Shimon Lev
Gandhi presented his demanding suggestion to the European Jews to adopt his Satyagraha strategy in order to resist the Nazi type of racist violence. This harsh demand raised a variety of responses. The most known critics were the philosopher, Martin Buber, and the American Jewish leader, Judea Magnes. Both argued that the conditions and circumstances in Nazi Germany were so extreme that there was no possibility of implementing Satyagraha against Hitler’s regime.

Read more